1:5 Students has dyslexia......

The most common learning disability

Parents and Educators during a recent Dyslexia Simulation.  Our Upcoming Events page  details tutoring sessions, workshops and volunteer training.  We invite you to join us!

Parents and Educators during a recent Dyslexia Simulation.  Our Upcoming Events page  details tutoring sessions, workshops and volunteer training.  We invite you to join us!








Our mission

Tutor Eau Claire Dyslexia Resource Center's primary mission is to raise awareness of Dyslexia and offer practical solutions for students with Dyslexia, the most common learning disability and leading cause of reading failure. 

As the literacy outreach of Eau Claire Shalom Ministries* in Columbia, SC, we provide affordable multi-sensory language training for tutors, tutoring for children, and support for parents and educators of Dyslexic students.


Our History

Tutor Eau Claire was founded in 1999 by Tracey and Hap Ely to meet the needs of struggling/dyslexic students in their neighborhood.  Learn more about the early years of Tutor Eau Claire at Seeding A Garden.

*Eau Claire Shalom Ministries, is a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1995 to serve the Eau Claire community of Columbia, SC. 

 

 Tutor Eau Claire Dyslexia Resource Center offers real solutions ... and hope for struggling readers.

Tutor Eau Claire Dyslexia Resource Center:

  • Partners with schools and community groups to raise awareness of Dyslexia.
  • Offers quarterly community workshops, monthly Dyslexia Discussion Groups and regularly scheduled tutor training using an Orton-Gillingham influenced multisensory language program.
  • Supports parents through consultation, workshops, assessments and referrals.
  • Provides individual and group tutoring programs that improve reading proficiency.
  • Maintains a Dyslexia Resource Library.
  • Advocates for improvements in our educational system and for strong legislation on behalf of people with Dyslexia and related learning disabilities.

 

 

Our Helpful Hints for Reading is available at all Richland libraries.

Dyslexic students need a different approach to learning language from that employed in most classrooms. They need to be taught slowly and thoroughly, the basic elements of their language—the sounds and the letters which represent them—and how to put these together and take them apart. They have to have lots of practice in having their hands, eyes, ears and voices working together for the conscious organization and the retention of their learning.
— Margaret Rawson, founding member of International Dyslexia Association